City regrets not consulting cyclists before creating bike lanes on unridable streets.

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After the much publicized removal of parking from arterial Brock and Johnson streets, city traffic engineers are backpeddling their expectations after finding out that cyclists have no intention of using their newly minted lanes.┬áLocal officials admitted that, while hindsight is 20/20, most bicycles don’t have rear-view mirrors at all.

“I guess it’s a problem of tabletop implementation,” admitted one source. “Everyone sitting around the table came up with this huge list of benefits and advantages that it would bring, so we just rolled with it.”

However, their planning failed to address one critical point. “We never asked anyone who actually cycles in the city whether it was worthwhile,” he admitted. “Once we started the process, we got feedback about how pointless it would be, and that got us worried.”

Local cyclists have admitted that the move will make little difference in their daily commutes.

“I guess it’s good to be bike friendly,” acknowledged one peddler “but I’m sure as hell not going to ride on that road. Even before you start looking at the bad pavement, potholes, uneven drainage grates, and awkward sightlines, the scariest part of the whole thing is still the way people drive along that road. Why would I put myself in that position when there are completely viable and safer alternatives?”

These concerns were echoed by other saddle-seaters.

“Why would I ride along Johnson and risk my neck, when I could go one block over to Earl street? There are lots of stop signs, minimal traffic, wide roads, and no lights. It just doesn’t make sense!”

Although sparking controversy, the eternally optimistic tourism industry believes this could be a big benefit.

“People from out of town will love it,” They beamed. “If they don’t know what dangers they’re facing, it will make for an adventure they’ll never forget. Soon we could be a hugely exciting extreme sports destination in the region!”

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